Help – Resources I Need

Some resources I know are available but I have not been able to locate, or if located, can’t manage to get a copy in any type of media.  If you can help, I’d be very grateful.

1. Malinda Maynor Lowery, “Drowning Creek” (unpublished undergraduate thesis, Harvard University, 1995)

2.  South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, South Carolina Field notes from the research of Wesley D. (White) Taukchirary in the archives of North andSouth Carolina pertaining to indigenous tribes including the coastal Algonquians (i.e. Chowan, Machapunga, Pamlico, Roanoke).

3.  Cherokee Communities of the South by Robert K. Thomas – page 30 only – my copy is missing this page, and it is of course, critical.

44 Responses to Help – Resources I Need

  1. Barbara says:

    Roberta,
    Cornell University has “The most ironic story in American history; an authoritative, documented history of the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina,” but it’s in the Kroch Library Rare & Manuscripts, which means they’ll let me look at it, but I can’t carry it off to a copy machine. Is there something in particular you’re looking for?
    Barbara
    https://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?v1=1&hd=1,1&CallBrowse=1&SEQ=20120523145637&PID=ZrJw9fH3x3k0m02198whanVtPg0oq&SID=3

    • I found this book at the Wilson library, so I’m good on this one. Thanks so much for your offer of help.

      • Joseph Martin says:

        Saw you post. Not sure that I can help you but I’m a direct descendant of Gen Joseph Martin, my 4th G/Grandfather. We have done some DNA and now have 44 different Martin families identified, only one group of Martins related to him and a few more names that tested as a direct descendant of Gen Joseph.. I’m certain of the folloeing: He had 7 children with Sarah Lucas, 11 with Susannah Graves and 2 with Betsy Ward, a total of 20 children, No more Indian wives and no more children. His brother John Martin Sr. was the father of Judge John Martin Jr. the first Chief Justice of the cherokee nations both east and west. I just completed a thesis for the Tahlequah Cherokee Justices, Chief Baker and the attorney general concerning the placement of a monument, we plan to erect in Tahlequah on Sat, June 8th at our 3 day family reunion 2013.
        Would be happy to share any of the 25,000 names and many books of information on the Martin family from 1725 to present day, some info going back to 1066AD.
        I also have the information on Betsy children.. Nancy remained in TN Bradley county raised 12 children, home still being lived in today. James C Martin went to Going Snake district and died there (adair county) in 1847, his wife had already died. He left a 7 yr old daughter, Guyunegoo at his death and she was assigned a guardian by the court. No info on her.
        Warm regards,
        Col Joseph L. Martin
        Arizona

      • Is there a link where I can see what happened to the 20 children? There are many Martin families in Lee Co., Va. and Claiborne/Hawkins/Hancock County, Tennessee that would be candidates to be descended from him.

  2. Nancy says:

    Roberta,

    Can’t find your e-mail address now, but I did find those two articles about the Dartmouth Indian Students.

    I scanned them to pdf and put it in my dropbox for you – here is the link.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/gv8ybo2lnkbooan/DartmouthIndianStudents.pdf

    Let me know if this doesn’t work right and I will try to e-mail the file.

  3. Malinda Lowery says:

    Hi Roberta, I just stumbled upon your site. I have a copy of my undergraduate thesis but I’m really not sure it would be useful for you, I’d rather share my more advanced research, but as its been published, maybe you’ve already seen it? In any case, are you familiar with the website http://www.lumbeebibliography.net?

  4. Hi Roberta,
    I’m a writer researching the Cross family line in colonial Rhode Island for our blog, CrossingPaths. They originated in South Kingstown, Rhode Island, on former Narragansett lands. We run out of records before the 1790 census. Is there anyone to whom you can refer me? Are their repositories of free African-Americans/Indians in colonial New England records?

  5. Deedee says:

    Roberta, if you will e-mail me I have dozens of contemporary legal records for one of your recent subjects. I researched this subject for years and compiled a large file of records I’m happy to share. 🙂

  6. To determine Grandfathers true
    Name, Age, an Cherokee Tribe
    He came from!
    Was a prisoner at :
    Carlile Ind Indian School till 1910!
    Dawes # 8007 CC – 3256 P- 287

    • We are descendants of Mohawk Chief Joseph A. Onasakerat (aka)Whitefeather. I would like to know my Native American name for my daughter, granddaughter and myself. I, also
      am of Black Dutch descent of John and Letitica (Van Ordean?) Scott-Brown and York Brown. My 1st name is Marilyn, Simone is my daughter and her daughter is Taylor Joi.
      I, am proud of my Heritage and the Brown Family was given a Citation from the NJ State
      Legislation.

      Would you be so kind as to assist me. Thanking you in advance.

      Ms. Marilyn J. Taylor (marilyn.taylor29 @yahoo.com

  7. Carlile Ind, Indian School, Pa
    Inmates were mixed Tribe,
    Names given indicated Tribe
    Such as : William H. White.
    William – White = Cherokee
    ( H ) = Hoopla Valley, Sacremento,
    California!
    Valley was a Fort with US Soldiers
    to control individual Tribes!
    William H. Was my G Great Grandfather,
    Inmate and translator from Tsulagi
    Into English for young Cherokees!
    His Uncle , Lonney, ” Kai Yaii”‘
    Escaped, and swam the Monongahelia
    River, and fought soldiers with a
    Knife, till they killed my G Uncle!
    William H. White made me put
    To memory, these words , and
    His School Number – 8007 !
    I am 68 and failing, so I decided
    To pass-on to my Daughters , their
    Cherokee Blood and Tribe!
    Daughters are: Susquehanna
    Whitefeather & Jenny, Facebook!
    Daughters are Great GG Daughters
    Of Menewakee, a son of Nehmecoln,
    Delaware , Chief !
    Ie – Barney Fortune!

  8. Candy lloyd aka loyd says:

    Hello, I want to track down my family. My great grandpa was Cherokee. My families surname is Loyd. Most of my family lived in Tennessee known as Lloyd aka Loyd. I know that our Indiana connection is Tennessee by the smokies and Carolina. I was told our Indian heritage started with a male full blooded Cherokee and a white woman named Mary.

  9. itschac says:

    Hello Candy! best place for you to find someone in your family would be feramenta facebook! I have some groups that deal with this matter Cherokee:

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/297114690392009/

  10. ITSCHAC says:

    Dear Roberta this group facebook genetic cousins​​,Candy lloyd aka loyd is easier to find some relatives Cherokee

  11. looking for info on robert and mary green. they were suppose to be full blooded Choctaw’s in ms.around1800-1850. they had tow daughter’s one married a greenlee and the other married a Huffman . the one that married a Huffman was my ggrandmother. we have traced from there down. but like to prove the indian blood line. thanks john schonfarber .

  12. neshnabe says:

    I certainly hope this project/organization is still going; very interesting indeed. Miigwetch for all your hard work, and your determination.I am bodewadimi and Lenape, I reside on the present- day Canadian side of Turtle Island. I come from the Walpole Island First Nation! Very informative for all!

  13. Teresa Dahler says:

    Thank you for the kindness all of you who reply to those who are searching for their ancestors; people just don’t know how to go about learning. That’s what I want to offer-tell everyone to study their people’s histories first, before exploring for specific ancestors. Then by knowing the histories it is easier to find your people.

  14. Paul Figas says:

    Hello I have a wooden cup with the image of an American Indian on it Below the image it says Cheif Kokomo Robe. Any info to its age or origin would be great.

    Thank you
    Paul

  15. Robert Sherman Nix III says:

    Hello, I am working to advocate for lost Indians descendants and their rights and benefits.

    • I am keeping this page focused towards history and away from current politics, as best I can. I want to help people find their Native ancestors. Good luck to you, but this isn’t the place.

      • Robert Sherman Nix III says:

        One of the most important things anyone can do is seek information from all elders in your family or friends who recall facts or tidbits of information of Indians of your older generations to at least your first half-breed ancestors, so that it does not become lost and unobtainable. Then try to research backwards to see if their parents, grant-parents, or great-grand-parents were enrolled in a tribal record when placed onto tribal reservations under treaty’s with the USA, which is the basis of their tribal enrollment records: those who did not enroll in the listing of names , but were full blood Indians have left descendants who are not enrolled in a tribe. Therefore, it is ideal that descendants find a Indian enrollment record or census record or State record or any other record supporting their claim to Indian ancestry as it helps to fully be more specific in genealogy, which in the end can only lead into the names of the last recorded Indian ancestors and families. My half-breed ancestor was my grandmother, the mother of my father, whose names and births and deaths are obtained on State birth records and other records past the 1800’s. Then the next possible step is to find my Indian ancestor on tribal enrollment records or other records . My grandmother half-blood Indian was Fannie Belle Willingham, and her rmother was just ”Belle” or ”Bell”.
        Therefore, I have basic clues to work on to find nmy Indian ancestor Belle on Indian enrollment records, Cherokee Indian enrollment records mandates by treaty law of the reservation treaty time periods.
        I have those clues, from my early childhood visits with my great-aunts, because my father’s aunts gave me that information and those great-aunts were born in the 1890’s and my half-blood ancestor Fannie Belle was their sister-in-law.

        Therefore, it is very important to obtain an d record all the elders information or lost will names you need might be lost.

        Robert Sherman Nix III

  16. Liz B says:

    My husband and I recently took DNA tests and he tested 35% Native American. His mother’s family is from southern Mexico. Is there a more detailed test to find out which Native American group his family came from?

  17. You can find “Cherokee Communities of the South” at the following:

    https://works.bepress.com/robert_thomas/24/

    Just download it and scroll to he page you need. Madeline Griffin

  18. Kimberly jones says:

    Hello I was wanting to find out my Heritage Of my mothers side they were Cherokee And didn’t know how go a bouts it thank you

  19. Tammy says:

    Hello, I have traced my heritage to my grandfathers mother as she was full blooded Cherokee but I don’t have her parents name is there somewhere or someone who can help me with finding her parents names. My fathers side is also part Shawnee but I can only trace back to his parents names. Thank you

  20. Ellen Valentine says:

    I have traced my family history back to two families that may have been the descendants of the Chowan tribe. I believe that my Great Great Great Grandmother was Sarah Teters, née Pearis. I believe her mother was Rhoda Pearis the possible granddaughter of Thomas Hoyter the Chief of the Chowan tribe. I would like to learn more. If there is a possibility of communication, I would be very interested.

  21. Michelle Ma says:

    I have original photographs of Chief John Two Guns White Calf with my great-grandfather (who worked at Glacier National Park). Are you interested in those? How can we connect via email?

  22. Robert Sherman Nix III says:

    One of the most important things anyone can do is seek information from all elders in your family or friends who recall facts or tidbits of information of Indians of your older generations to at least your first half-breed ancestors, so that it does not become lost and unobtainable. Then try to research backwards to see if their parents, grant-parents, or great-grand-parents were enrolled in a tribal record when placed onto tribal reservations under treaty’s with the USA, which is the basis of their tribal enrollment records: those who did not enroll in the listing of names , but were full blood Indians have left descendants who are not enrolled in a tribe. Therefore, it is ideal that descendants find a Indian enrollment record or census record or State record or any other record supporting their claim to Indian ancestry as it helps to fully be more specific in genealogy, which in the end can only lead into the names of the last recorded Indian ancestors and families. My half-breed ancestor was my grandmother, the mother of my father, whose names and births and deaths are obtained on State birth records and other records past the 1800’s. Then the next possible step is to find my Indian ancestor on tribal enrollment records or other records . My grandmother half-blood Indian was Fannie Belle Willingham, and her rmother was just ”Belle” or ”Bell”.
    Therefore, I have basic clues to work on to find nmy Indian ancestor Belle on Indian enrollment records, Cherokee Indian enrollment records mandates by treaty law of the reservation treaty time periods.
    I have those clues, from my early childhood visits with my great-aunts, because my father’s aunts gave me that information and those great-aunts were born in the 1890’s and my half-blood ancestor Fannie Belle was their sister-in-law.

    Therefore, it is very important to obtain an d record all the elders information or lost will names you need might be lost.

    Robert Sherman Nix III

  23. Talib A. Cornelius says:

    Question the Henderson rolls, are supposed to be a list of Natives to be sent west. There is a list of several surnames. I found several last names associated with my family including mine on the list. However, once I read the list I did NOT see any of those and most of the surnames on the list. My great 3x grandfather was 12 at the time.
    When I called the Cherokee Nation as we started in NC, then Tennessee then Kentucky. They said if the surnames is not on the next list they died on the trail.
    However three family mine included also end up in Cumberland Kentucky. So how do I learn who has what surname. What happened to them. There was an Native school in Scott Kentucky that a couple of those with my surname escaped from.
    Cyrenius W Cornelius 1825-1900 is as far back as I can seem to get. My great2x grandfather also died in 1900 and my great grandfather was sent to live with a sister in Indian. At 12 so we have no knowledge of anything nor would have made it to the Dawes roll.

  24. Cody says:

    I’m looking for an authentic cherokee dream catcher, my friend has a lot in her bloodline and unless it’s created with meaning I don’t think it will help, it’s very important, if anyone has information that could help me me email is cody.jennings.30@gmail.com, please and thank you

  25. Kim Jordan says:

    I am looking for some language help. I am working on a genealogical project for my 88 year old Grandmother. Her mother was raised like an orphan, she was the youngest of many children and was given to a hotel manager to raise.

    I’ve been looking into my grandmothers family, and I am trying to find out about Mary “Katonka or Katona” Hale (1756-1818).

    Her Husband, Peter Sigmon (1745-1837), was stationed in Valley Forge from 1777-1779 then he and my 6th Great Grandmother were married, living in Franklin County, Virginia in 1780. I would love to be able to give her, her proper name, speculation of her proper name or any more information other than she was thought to be Native American.

    I don’t speak, know, can find or successfully use phonetics of Native American languages to find Katonka, Katona or what this name may have evolved from.

    Her name is the only clue I have to figure out where she was from.

    I do not need anything official, just does this mean anything? If so what?

    Thank you.

    • If you can find someone who descends from her through all females to the current generation which can be either gender, you can test their mitochondrial DNA to see if her mother was Native.

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