Native Names in One Place

I’ve been transcribing historical records of Native people’s names now for months.  Years actually.  But it was only recently that it occurred to me that we really needed to put this information in one place.  I had a lot of resource material already, including two of my own data bases.  One is called “Families of Interest” in which I’ve been compiling records of mixed race people for years.  A second resource that I’ve created is my Timeline.  The timeline is not indexed by name.  It’s just that, a historical timeline.  The data base has about 7000 entries and the timeline, several thousands pages.  From that information, and from other sources, which you can see under the Resource Tab, I’m compiling all of the Native names I can find.  That new document I simply call Native Names.  So far, this document is over 800 pages and I’m no place near finished.  It’s an amazing process.

I also want to comment that this is not genealogy.  I’m not working on families genealogies.  If family genealogical information contains original documentation of Native ancestry, I’d certainly love to include it.  My primary reason for doing this is so that people can find their ancestors, their surnames and to provide a starting point.  Family history without documentation is not what I’m looking for within this project.  Family history WITH original documentation is indeed welcome.

I find such interesting tidbits as I go along and work with these records.  The people and groups have a life of thier own and it’s often told through the records of the group of poeple, not just their individual records. 

As I work with these records, I’ll be blogging about my finds and interesting things that come to light.  If you’re interested in Native history, then this is a blog you’ll want to to follow!

Roberta Estes

Advertisements

About Roberta Estes

Scientist, author, genetic genealogist. Documenting Native Heritage through contemporaneous records and DNA.
This entry was posted in Purpose. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Native Names in One Place

  1. Carolina Carol says:

    Well Roberta … I am happy to find your blog (through a recent Lost Colony of Roanoke DNA Project posting). After reading your blog, I think that it was destined that we make a connection. I have grown up between Southeastern Va and Northeastern NC. I have always known that I had native heritage on my mom’s (Bulls) side of my family. In the past few years, I have come to realize that I likely have native heritage on my father’s (Elks) side of our family. After reading some of the recent writings of folks theorizing what happened to the early settlers at the Lost Colony, I began to have some conversations with folks in my family and I found out hat geographically our Elks family members could easily have migrated from such roots. I have not begun at active search for a paper trail but I would like to. I see that you have a book/writing entitled, “Everything Elks.” Is that something that I might be able to read? I am hopeful of making a connection and perhaps having a conversation with you in the not too distant future. Please let me know how we might arrange that. In the meantime, I am sending you the link to a recent blog that I wrote about my native heritage. As you can see, there is so much that I do not know but would like to discover.

    http://closetotheland.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/my-native-heart/

    Thanks for the work you are doing and for your willingness to share it. I am hopeful of hearing from you at your convenience. With much appreciation, Carolina Carol

  2. I know how much you like old maps. Have you seen this site

    http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/collection/colonial-williamsburg-foundation?projectId=art-project&v.view=list

    It has a number of old maps and images of colonial Native people

  3. Pingback: Thanksgiving Conundrum | Native Heritage Project

  4. Pingback: Thanksgiving Conundrum | DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy

  5. Sande White says:

    Love to find out parents of my 1/2 Chickasaw great-grandmother Laura Elizabeth Smallwood (born in GA ca.1838 ). She married Pleasant Barns/es in Tennessee. Reently did Family Finder and showed no Native American ancestry ( although did show 11+% Middle East ( which someone said could incorporate the Native American )

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s