Sappone Indians Cabbins

Saponi note0001 cropped

A deed between John Taylor of Surry Co., Va., seller, and Alexander Bruce of Amelia County, buyer, for 330 acres located in Amelia County, Va., was dated November 8, 1737.  This deed specifies the location of the “Sappone Indians Cabbins,” as follows:

“Beginning at a white oak above the Sappone Indians Cabbins, thence south 10 degrees, east 302 poles to a corner hicory near a branch of Winnigham Creek, thence east 10 degrees north 164 ples to a corner shrub white oak, thence noth 10 degrees west 218 poles to two corner Spanish oaks a the fork of a small spring branch thence down the said branch as it meanders to the said creek, thence up the creek as it meanders to the first station.

Winnigham Creek is now Winningham Creek, if it wasn’t always.

In the 1982 journal, “Quarterly Bulletin – Archaeological Society of Virginia,” Vol. 37, C. G. Holland contributed an article titled “Saponi Note” on page 42.  In his article, Mr. Holland used the USGS maps of the Crewe area where Winningham Creek begins, and fit this metes and bounds description to the map, including the two waterways.  He indicates that only one location fits the survey, and that based on the location of the survey, the Sappone Cabbins were located on the south side of Winningham Creek and west of State Route 617.   His hand drawn map is shown above.

On a contemporary map, the location is shown below.  The blue balloon to the right is the intersection of Winningham Creek and 617, also known as Winningham Creek Road.  The second balloon, further to the left is the approximate location of the Saponi Cabins basd on Holland’s map.

Saponi Cabin

Moving this map further out, I have also marked the location of Crewe, the closest town, in current day Nottoway County, Va.

saponi cabin 2

Adding some other locations relevant to the Saponi, you can see Fort Christanna to the lower right and to the lower left of the Saponi Cabin location, you can see where the Saponi, two towns, east and west, were reported to be located in 1671 by Lederer.

saponi cabin 3

We also know that prior to 1711, the Saponi were living in North Carolina, so they moved about a fair bit, probably in response to pressure from both settlers and other Native tribes.

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About robertajestes

Scientist, author, genetic genealogist. Documenting Native Heritage through contemporaneous records and DNA.
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6 Responses to Sappone Indians Cabbins

  1. Jean Starns says:

    In researching my Sisk family line recently, I discovered that my 3x great grandfather, Allen Ezekiel Sisk, married Elizabeth Isobel Howard. Her paternal grandmother was Adrah Narcissa Collins, apparently a daughter of Samuel and Amey Collins, said to be descended from Saponi Indians. Out of curiosity, would you know if Samuel an Amey were full Native American, partial African American slaves/Native Americans, or partial White/Native American? Also, it is my impression that the Saponi no longer exist as a tribe. Were they all killed or did they assimilate into another tribe?
    Thank you for any help you can give me.

    Jean Starns

  2. Cindy Tackett Cullum Bou says:

    Hi Jean, I descend from Allen Ezekiel Sisk as well, and he is also my 3x’s Great Grandfather. I don’t know if this helps or hurts but, I just completed my DNA testing and where I have 68% English Irish DNA I have less than 1% Indian DNA. Something to ponder.

  3. Hello,
    My name is Jeanette White Eyes. I am the one that posted to research in the Collins/Howard/Sisk line. These are my great grandfathers also. Please email me so I can give you more info.

    Thank you,
    mineese40@hotmail.com

    • Bob says:

      I e-mailed you for help with the research on Amey Collins and the Saponi Tribe information. I am a descendant of hers through her daughter Adrah and Seth Howard.

  4. I am a Winningham, we are listed as a family that were made up from 3 tribes, Edistoe , Peedee and santee Sioux tribe of Indians, Most of the Sioux tribes which were many including the sapponi all mixed into larger tribes of Sioux and then in with the largest of tribes such as Cherokee, Creek, etc Most of the Cherokees , creeks, Seminoles, Choctaws, Chickasaws are whats left of the Sioux tribes and are mostly recognized as one of the civilized tribes now, their are remnants of these tribes of families that were not a part of the first removal in the late 1700s They mostly followed the migration west, to Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama and later to Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, and Texas, Hope this helps.

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