Lost Trail of Tears Segment Discovered

Google Earth has helped with a lot of things.  I’ve used it to locate potential archaeology dig sites, to find historical locations, and of course, to look at my own house.

Now we can add to that list that it has been used to discover a segment of the Trail of Tears that had been lost to history.  This isn’t a spur, either, but one of the main roads where thousands crossed the Stones River on the way to their ultimate fate.

An article in Indian Country gives the details:  http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/09/20/lost-trail-of-tears-segment-discovered-using-google-earth-134920

The good news is that this segment is already being preserved, albeit, inadvertently.  The land is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers and part of it is a horse trail today.  This makes access easy for the public.

The segment has been confirmed as part of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail by the National Park Service.

Hat tip to Steve for this great piece of news!

Photo copyright and compliments of www.nativehistoryassociation.org.

Advertisements

About robertajestes

Scientist, author, genetic genealogist. Documenting Native Heritage through contemporaneous records and DNA.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Lost Trail of Tears Segment Discovered

  1. Pat Cummins says:

    Hello Native Heritage Project, Very nice website!! On behalf of the Native History Association – Thank you for reposting our article on the Google Earth Discovery of the Old Jefferson segment of the Trail of Tears in Middle Tennessee. I would like to ask that you please credit the photo attached to our story to (www.nativehistoryassociation.org ) as it is copyrighted by our organization. We’re very honored to have our story featured here along with the photo, but as I’m sure you understand, we must insist that our copyrighted images are properly credited and protected. Thank you for your understanding. Keep up the excellent work!

    Sincerely,
    Pat Cummins
    President,
    Native History Association

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s